Best Places to Visit in Malaysia

Last Updated On January 31, 2022

Malaysia is a land of differences, where numerous languages and cultures mix and blend to form a distinctly Southeast Asian nation unlike any of its neighbors. From walking around Unesco-listed historical wonders to exploring the 130-million-year-old jungle, Malaysia never runs out of places to visit. Malaysia has a stunning coastline, tropical islands, and sun-bleached coral reefs. The humid jungles of Borneo and the mainland are home to various unusual fauna, while the highlands provide a welcome break from the heat.

Petronas Twin Towers

The Petronas Twin Towers are Malaysia's most famous landmarks and unique structures. The twin towers lie on Jalan Ampang Road in Kuala Lumpur. The original function of these twin towers was to house the different offices out of Kuala Lumpur. But now it is one of the most famous tourist destinations in Kuala Lumpur.

The Petronas Twin Towers, built by Argentine-born American architect Cesar Pelli, is one of the world's highest structures. The steel, glass, and reinforced concrete towers were constructed in a Postmodern-Islamic architectural style and cost 1.6 billion US dollars. The Petronas Twin Towers have 88 floors, plus five underground levels.

A spectacular double Decker Skybridge connects the two breathtaking Towers on the 41st and 42nd floors. The 192-foot-long bridge is the world's tallest two-story bridge. The Skybridge also serves as a safety device and a stabilizing structure against turbulent winds in extreme weather.

Aside from being a prominent tower on the Kuala Lumpur skyline, it also has several world-class restaurants and stunning overlooks from which you can see the entire city sprawled out under you. You can also visit the many tourist attractions, temples, mosques, and famous Malaysian markets nearby the Petronas Twin Towers.

Petronas Twin Towers

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Malacca City, Malacca

Malacca City, the capital of Malacca State, is steeped in history and culture. The colonial city along the Malacca Strait has been a Unesco World Heritage Site since 2008 and attracts visitors with native architecture, food, and the famous Jonker Street Night Market. Not only did it have periods under Portuguese and Dutch rule, but the 15th-century Malacca Sultanate is often regarded as a golden moment for Malay culture. Top attractions include St Paul's Church, A Famosa Fort, and Stadthuys (the official residence of the Dutch governor).

Malacca City, Malacca

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Taman Negara National Park

Taman Negara National Park is a vast green beauty in the Malay Peninsula's heart. It spans 4,300 square kilometers and includes primeval rainforest (some of the world's oldest established woodland, according to some) and winding rivers where elephants can be seen lounging on the muddy banks. Today, Taman Negara is being elevated to the status of Malaysia's eco-tourism capital, with visitors coming from all over the world. 

Taman Negara National Park

George Town, Penang

George Town is an open museum. The colonial district boasts a wide selection of British buildings and churches and is home to Fort Cornwallis. Stroll through the streets and see traditional shophouses, each with an individual style and design. Street art and murals decorate the walls too. Combine this history with temples (including Kek Lok Si), food courts, a vibrant shopping scene, and the longest coffee shop in the country, and there’s little wonder why George Town is a top place to visit.

George Town, Penang

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The Perhentians, Terengganu

Perhentian Island, located off the coast of Terengganu, is a famous beach destination just off the Terengganu in the South China Sea. It is one of Malaysia's most beautiful spots. The region consists of seven islands, five of which are uninhabited; the other two are known as Besar and Kecil. Imagine white sand stretching across sparsely populated places and crystal-clear water lapping against the beach if you want to vacation there. Scuba diving, snorkeling, and canoeing are among the most popular activities. However, avoid visiting between March and October, when most hotels and guesthouses close.

The Perhentians, Terengganu

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Alor Setar

The majority of visitors to Kedah spend their time at Langkawi. However, roughly 34 miles (55 kilometers) southeast of the famed island is an unknown city known as Alor Setar. The ornate Zahir Mosque, the Big Clock Building, the Royal Hall, and the Sultan Museum are all located in the center square. You can visit the 250 million-year-old, the 218m  tall Gunung Keriang limestone hill, a little further out. Visit adjacent Kuala Kedah and wander through the ruins of the oldest Malay fort in Northern Malaysia, which dates from the 17th century.

Alor Setar

Photo by Muhammad Faiz Zulkeflee on Unsplash 

The Cameron Highlands, Pahang

William Cameron, a British surveyor, found the Cameron Highlands in 1885, and it has only risen in popularity as a tourist destination since then. Today, emerald-green tea estates, as well as strawberry and vegetable farms, dominate the skyline. If you attend, you'll almost certainly like the colder weather and the options for trekking.

The Cameron Highlands, Pahang

Kota Kinabalu, Sabah

Kota Kinabalu, the capital of Sabah, may not appear lovely at first glance. However, behind the malls and buildings are stretches of orange sand, islands that can be reached in 10 minutes, and the famed floating mosque. Take a stroll along Likas Bay to admire the shoreline and islands, or head to Tanjung Aru Beach for a stunning sunset. The Tunku Abdul Rahman Marine Park's five islands are an excellent day trip for snorkeling, beaches, and relaxing. You can visit the pristine jungle by driving a short distance from the city.

Mosque in Kota Kinabalu, Sabah

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Pangkor Island, Perak

Pangkor Island is a small archipelago in the Malacca Strait. Pangkor Island, once a haven for sailors and pirates, has remained untouched for decades, providing you the opportunity to explore an unspoiled tropical paradise — the population is only 30,000. You can do things like sunbathing on the beach, renting a motorcycle, and traveling around the perimeter, as well as diving and snorkeling. Every night at 6:30 p.m., the proprietor of Sunset View Chalet in Teluk Nipah on the west coast feeds or more wild hornbills.

Pangkor Island, Perak

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Danum Valley, Sabah

Do you enjoy doing eco-tours? Then Danum Valley is the best spot to visit in Malaysia, as it offers unspoiled jungles and incredible biodiversity. Hundreds, if not thousands, of wildlife and flora species can be found inside the 169sqmi (438sqkm) protection area. You might see orangutans, pygmy elephants, or a clouded leopard among the untamed wilds. Activities include guided forest excursions, nocturnal safaris, and visits to ancient Kadazan-Dusun burial sites.

Danum Valley, Sabah

Photo by Mikhail Nilov from Pexels